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Campaign in Manchester tackles loneliness

31st May 2015

This news article is from Handicare UK. Articles that appear on this website are for information purposes only.

Greater Manchester was named as the first ‘age-friendly’ city in Britain, and is now looking to improve on this further with a pilot campaign. Securing £55 million in funding, the city now hopes to help people live longer, healthier lives by focusing on a number of areas. This includes getting over 55s into work, tackling social isolation and ensuring elderly people are in appropriate housing with necessary adaptations such as stair lifts.

According to statistics in the Manchester Evening News, it is estimated that by 2028 the number of people over the age of 65 in Manchester will have increased by 41 per cent, and those over the age of 85 by 81 per cent. This means that a plan of action is required, in order to cater for the rising number of older people in the city.

Helping older people experience a happier and healthier life

Now, town hall bosses across the region want to set up an ‘ageing’ hub, by exploring a potential partnership with New Economy and the charity Centre for Ageing Better. This idea comes on the back of Greater Manchester’s historic devolution deal, which will see the region take control of its £6 billion health budget and housing and skills cash.

As mentioned above, Manchester became the first city to be endorsed by the World Health Organisation, and has since been commended for using arts and culture to tackle issues in the community such as social isolation. Leaders have also been praised for including older people in decisions that will affect them.

This will be no different with the new pilot scheme, as town hall chiefs are keen to get older people involved in the projects, naming them ‘co-researchers’. The 10 councils of Great Manchester will be working on the plan in the coming months, alongside New Economy policy experts and Public Health England.

Image Credit: Beth Rankin (Flickr.com)

This content was written by Emily Bray. Please feel free to visit my Google + profile to read more stories.