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Experts call for self-management help for arthritis sufferers

30th May 2014

This news article is from Handicare UK. Articles that appear on this website are for information purposes only.

A report has called for a dedicated focus on the state of Britain’s arthritis crisis, suggesting that there are millions of sufferers who are being left with huge levels of pain.

Affecting around 10 million people across the UK, arthritis can have a huge impact on the level of a person’s rate of mobility. However, there are no defined treatments for pain management of the condition and while mobility aids such as walk in baths and showers can make life easier for those with arthritis, only methods of self-management prove effective.

The report, which was collated by Arthritis Care, states that only a third of all patients are offered help with self-management, leaving a large majority in substantial pain as a result. This figure comes from a survey carried out by the charity earlier this month to highlight Arthritis Care Week, with the results showing that 70 per cent endure constant pain.

Millions in constant agony
Judi Rhys, chief executive of the charity, said that millions of people are in constant agony because of the lack of effective treatments, adding that it is a scandal that a third of patients are being offered assistance with self-management.

Professor Philip Conaghan, a medical advisor to Arthritis Care, said that the lack of support is having a huge impact on the life of sufferers, decreasing quality of life whilst increasing the dependence on friends, family and the healthcare system.

According to the survey carried out by Arthritis Nation, the pain of arthritis grew stronger over time and of the 2,008 people questioned only 10 per cent who had suffered for more than 20 years said that it was no longer painful.

Also yielded from the survey was news that almost 25 per cent of those questioned said their pain is just bearable, while one in ten say the condition prevents them from getting in and out of their chair, gardening or even using the stairs. The latter issue in particular is why home stairlifts are so effective in helping people live with arthritis.

Image Credit: Judy Ben Joud (Shutterstock.com)