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Importance of stairlift manufacture evident in Yorkshire

14th February 2014

This news article is from Handicare UK. Articles that appear on this website are for information purposes only.

Yorkshire’s healthcare sector has been described as the envy of Britain, with stairlift manufacture leading to big profits. Employment partner at Ward Hadaway, Richard Port, has said that this is as a result of “Major shifts in national healthcare policy, combined with issues such as an ageing population, and efforts to promote healthier lifestyles [meaning] that a wide range of different businesses serving a variety of needs are faced with more and more opportunities”.

The healthcare and innovation sectors have been recognised as key strengths of the city of Leeds in particular, with several initiatives and projects being put forward there which appear to have led to this success. With healthcare companies in the region securing over £100 million worth of turnover and appearing in Fastest 50 lists over the last three years, the north would appear to be recognising the need for a higher national focus on healthcare facilities and products.

Why the boom?

Home stairlifts manufacture and DNA sequencing are among the services to be booming of late thanks to ongoing developments in technology across the sector. These advancements have triggered a drive in innovation and the opening up of new markets, of which Yorkshire healthcare companies have taken full advantage to facilitate demand.

Port said in this article that Yorkshire is well placed to make the most of these developments, with many top educational facilities and research companies around the area. Yet it is not just Yorkshire where the healthcare sector is booming, as across the country and even overseas developments in technology have brought down the cost of walk in baths and mobility aids, making them more accessible for the older generation.

Image Credit: Greg Neate (flickr.com)