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Innovative Mobility robot takes first steps

11th November 2014

This news article is from Handicare UK. Articles that appear on this website are for information purposes only.

Honda’s new humanoid robot, Asimo (Advanced Step in Innovative Mobility), has taken its first steps in the UK. Following the news of home care droids being developed in Japan, as detailed in this previous article, further steps towards robots helping elderly individuals across the world have been taken with Honda’s new technology taking its first steps on British soil. The intelligent robot ‘is eventually intended to help people in various situations of need, such as the elderly.’

The robot, which is 4ft 3in in height, has been worked on by the Japanese firm for almost 30 years, but was only publicly unveiled in 2000. Since then, a number of updated versions have been produced, with the current robot featuring a number of new and improved features, with a total of 34 motors helping the robot perform human-like movements.

Created with the aim of helping people in the home

As shown at the Wired conference in East London, Asimo is able to climb stairs, run in a circle, lean his body to counterbalance, kick a ball and hold a cup without crushing it, and is hoped to one day be able to assist those in the home. Engineers are still working on Asimo’s physical capabilities and battery life, as he currently only lasts for approximately 30 minutes, but eventually would like to release the robot for domestic use. Honda did not deny that the robot would be able to be purchased alongside other domestic appliances in the future.

Although they are unable to specify an upcoming date of when they hope to release Asimo, it is a much welcomed idea with many who may be able to benefit from the robot. Those with home stair lifts and walk in showers would be able to be assisted even further with help from the robot, and could also support those caring for elderly parents or relatives with mobility disabilities.

Image Credit: MsSaraKelly (Flickr.com)

This content was written by Emily Bray. Please feel free to visit my Google + profile to read more stories.