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Dubai Aims For Complete Accessibility By 2020

30th March 2017

This news article is from Handicare UK. Articles that appear on this website are for information purposes only.

The International Dubai Code for Accessibility has been talked about for many months and is due to come into effect imminently. In an effort to alter more than just physical accessibility there are hopes that a positive and understanding attitude towards education and the workplace will increase the inclusivity, an aim Dubai is attempting to achieve.

2020 is the year that all these changes must be accounted by. Whether that is older buildings being fitted with the latest mobility accessories or increased quotas of those with limited mobility in the work place. The most immediate alteration that this code will have is to prospective buildings so they include all accessible facilities including disabled bathrooms. Under the new code, any new building will have to be fully accessible in both plans and completion. Many feel this is in an effort to alter the attitudes of developers, who should be seeing accessibility as something integral to the design of a building as opposed to an after-thought. 

 

Dubai has lots of technology integrated into its infrastructure but there are reports that these should be built more specifically with disability in mind: "Touch screens at the airport, destination elevators with no buttons on the inside, all add a layer of complexity," said David Capozzi, executive director of the US federal access board that writes and updates standards.

The efforts towards the success of The International; Dubai Code for Accessibility have been inclusive from the start: “Involving people with disabilities and their families in policymaking is vital for the success and effectiveness of the policies,” said Al Osaimi, and these thoughts are mirrored by Daniela Bas, director for social policy and development at the United Nation’s department of economic and social affairs: "There is a difference between accessibility and a place that is usable. To have equal access does not mean it is usable."

With such positive improvements in place, Dubai not only improves the lifestyle of its own citizens, but its appeal as a tourist destination. Many with mobility issues are cautious of travelling where they cannot guarantee easily accessible rooms or disabled bathrooms, Dubai’s inclusive attitude gives hope to those who enjoy travel despite their restricted mobility. 

Image Credit: wedn