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5 National Trust locations to visit in Gloucestershire

30th May 2022

 

Gloucestershire is a beautiful county, home to picturesque countryside and fascinating urban areas. If you are looking for some brilliant things to do in the county, you will do well to consider Gloucestershire’s range of National Trust locations. To give you a sense of what is available, this guide highlights five of these amazing attractions, letting you know what to look forward to seeing as well as providing an insight into their level of accessibility, just in case you or someone you know uses stairlifts at home and wants to visit.

Newark Park

 

Situated amid the beauty of the Cotswolds, Newark Park is a glorious estate that looks down on Ozleworth Valley. This peaceful corner of Gloucestershire is home to expansive parkland and idyllic gardens to enjoy, as well as a historic house that dates back to 1550. Providing great intrigue when it comes to its architecture and a fascinating collection of furniture, there’s plenty to admire as you explore. Outside the woodland walks and garden strolls offer a great excuse to enjoy the local countryside and embrace nature. There are over 700 acres to enjoy so plenty of room for walks, there’s a tea pavilion for a tasty refreshment and plenty of pretty spots to take a load off and relax with friends or family.

Keri, from the travel blog, Ladies What Travel, has been to Newark Park, and describes a friendly encounter with a  local wild resident during her exploration of the grounds: “Even during our short stroll we were lucky enough to bump into one of the park’s five resident peacocks, which made both the kids’ day and my own. Obviously used to people, this little guy was happy to come over and say hello, even posing for some close-ups! One of the volunteers came over and said we were lucky to see him, as in bad weather the birds usually roost out of the way in the trees.”

In terms of accessibility at Newark Park, there are steep slopes and uneven paths to take into consideration, but there is designated disabled parking, an accessible toilet, and a ramp into the house that can be arranged for those who may require it.

You can read more about accessibility at Newark Park here.

READ ALSO: 5 National Trust locations to visit in Devon

Hidcote

 

For those looking to enjoy beautiful gardens, Hidcote is a special location, one of the UK’s most celebrated gardens and renowned around the world. Following the Arts and Crafts principles of design, this special outdoor location in the rolling hills of the Cotswolds covers four hectares. The intricately designed outdoor spaces are a delight to explore and the maze of narrow pathways will lead you to secret gardens that will never fail to surprise you. With a beautiful scene around each corner, it’s a wonderful place to spend an afternoon admiring the creativity or getting inspiration for your own garden.

There are also nice spots to sit down, enjoy the environment, and relax with a picnic, as Rebecca, from the blog Adventures in Warwickshire, explains: “We found a lovely spot under a big tree overlooking the fields to sit and have a picnic. There’s also a big open space that would be perfect for a picnic although there wasn’t a great deal of shade. Our three loved it as it was like a secret garden for them to explore.”

When it comes to accessibility at Hidcote, there is mobility parking in the main car park and there are wheelchair accessible routes available in the garden. However, the full route does contain slopes, steps, and grass that could potentially be obstacles to those with limited mobility.

You can read more about accessibility at Hidcote here.

Dyrham Park

 

Dyrham Park is an ancient parkland located near Bath with majestic trees and glorious views out to the Welsh mountains. With 270 acres of grounds available, there’s plenty of room for families to explore, relax and play. Dyrham Park is also home to a 17th-century mansion that became one of the most notable stately homes of its time. This wonderful Baroque mansion is home to an impressive collection of fine art, as well as Dutch Delftware, acquired over the years by the home’s former owner, the diplomat William Blathwayt. With fascinating exhibitions, walking trails, and seasonal family fun, Dyrham is definitely a location to include on your Gloucestershire to-do list.

Hannah, from the website, Get Lost Travel Blog, has spent time at Dyrham Park and recommends the following tip for getting the most out of your visit: “When you first enter Dyrham Park, be sure to pick up a map. They are available from the ticket booth in the car park. The Dyrham Park map is handy because it has all the walks and gardens mapped out so you can rest assured, you’re not going to miss anything.”

For those with limited mobility, there are electric mobility vehicles running between the car park and the garden/house, there is step-free access to the house, and wheelchairs are available while exploring the mansion. However, the park itself might pose a challenge to wheelchair users due to its uneven terrain.

You can read more about accessibility at Dyrham Park here.

READ ALSO: 5 National Trust locations to visit in Norfolk

Chedworth Roman Villa

 

Britain has some incredible monuments from its ancient Roman past and one of these is located in the county of Gloucestershire in the form of Chedworth Roman Villa. Nestled in a picturesque valley of the Cotswolds, visitors will encounter the remains of a grand Roman villa that would have been the envy of those across the nation. Here you can discover beautiful mosaic floors, bathhouse rooms, and amazing Hypocaust systems that once kept the water warm for the villa’s honoured guests. Chedworth goes beyond delighting those with an interest in Roman history, however, providing a truly tranquil location to relax in thanks to its leafy setting, rich wildlife, and walking trails.

Mary, from the family blog, Over 40 and a Mum to One, enjoyed her time visiting Chedworth Roman Villa with her son, sharing her fondness of the villa’s incredible mosaics: “When you spend time exploring Chedworth Roman Villa you’ll see that the mosaics are housed within a sheltered building and you walk along a suspended walkway to enjoy the remains. As you walk through the rooms, it’s important to look down to see what gems lie beneath your feet. The floors really are stunning.”

Chedworth provides mobility parking and an accessible toilet. The building with the main mosaics, dining room and bathhouse is accessible by ramp, however, it should be noted that most of the site is outdoors, with slopes and some steps to contend with.

You can read more about accessibility at Chedworth Roman Villa here.

Snowshill Manor

 

Located in the village of Snowshill is a 16th-century house known as Snowshill Manor – a must-visit during your time exploring Gloucestershire’s wonderful National Trust properties. Inside this grand house, visitors will find the sublime collection of objects that were of interest to the property’s former owner, Charles Paget Wade, an eccentric who amassed an enormous horde of fascinating items throughout the years. From toys and samurai armour to bicycles and musical instruments, there is a lot to see and appreciate. Snowshill Manor also boasts lovely gardens with brilliant vistas, a priest’s house, and a model village.

Lucy, who acts as an online guide to the area on her blog Explore the Cotswolds, has been to Snowshill Manor, sharing this insight into what to expect: “Everywhere you turn there’s something interesting to look at – furniture, sculptures, paintings and ornaments. Volunteer guides are available if you want to find out more about something which catches your eye.” Lucy also points out that on the way to the manor from the car park “there’s a café and tearoom where you can stop off for tea, cakes and snacks, with hot food served from 12–2pm.”

For those with accessibility considerations, there are two powered mobility vehicles available to hire and every building onsite is wheelchair accessible, including a part of the manor. However, not all of the manor and its grounds are mobility-friendly, as parts of the garden feature undulating paths, numerous steps, and the manor is about a 10-minute walk from the car park.

You can read more about accessibility at Snowshill Manor here.

READ ALSO: 5 National Trust locations to visit in Dorset

National Trust locations to visit in Gloucestershire

  • Newark Park
  • Hidcote
  • Dyrham Park
  • Chedworth Roman Villa
  • Snowshill Manor

Hopefully, the above suggestions have given you a few ideas for days out in Gloucestershire, courtesy of the National Trust. From Roman villas to grand gardens and manor houses, there’s plenty to enjoy, whether you are visiting alone, with friends, or taking the grandchildren for a fun but educational excursion.

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This news article is from Handicare UK. Articles that appear on this website are for information purposes only.