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What are the most accessible World Heritage Sites to visit in the UK?

3rd September 2018

The UK and its overseas territories are lucky enough to be home to 31 UNESCO World Heritage sites, which cover imposing bridges, palaces, and coastlines.

Not all of these sites are easily accessible, but fortunately, most do cater for visitors with mobility problems that need to use a stairlift or a wheelchair.

In the below infographic we’ve listed 10 of the most accessible world heritage sites that can be visited in the UK. The graphic looks at what makes these attractions so accessible so visitors who struggle to walk can plan their trip beforehand.

Most accessible World Heritage Sites to visit in the UK

Blenheim Palace

Built between 1705 and 1722, Blenheim Palace is located in a romantic park created by the famous landscape gardener 'Capability' Brown. It was previously owned by John Churchill, first Duke of Marlborough, and was the birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill.

Mobility facilities:

  • Wheelchairs and electric scooters can be hired
  • Disabled toilets
  • Accessible parking

Canterbury Cathedral, St Augustine's Abbey, and St Martin's Church

Canterbury Cathedral is the spiritual head of the Church of England and offers visitors a breath-taking mixture of Romanesque and Gothic architecture.

St Augustine's Abbey and St Martin's Church, which is the oldest church in England, reflect milestones in the history of Christianity in the UK.

Mobility facilities:

  • Wheelchairs and electric scooters can be hired
  • Disabled toilets
  • Accessible parking

City of Bath & Roman Baths

The city of Bath is recognised for having preserved the Roman ruins and 18th-century architectural features in the city. The famous Roman baths were built during the year 43 BC and are certainly worth a visit for those with mobility issues as it is a very accessible attraction.

Mobility facilities:

  • Wheelchairs and electric scooters can be hired
  • Disabled toilets
  • Accessible parking

Stonehenge

Arguably the most famous attraction on this list, Stonehenge is one of the world’s iconic ancient sites. The group of megaliths are believed to have been placed in such a way because they hold an astronomical significance.

Mobility facilities:

  • Wheelchairs can be hired
  • Disabled toilets
  • Accessible parking

Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abbey

This area of London is full of important historical and architectural monuments. Westminster Palace, rebuilt from the year 1840, features a neo-Gothic architectural style and Westminster Abbey is of great historic and symbolic significance. The abbey has seen many royal events take place there over the years, including the wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton.

Mobility facilities:

  • Wheelchairs can be hired
  • Disabled toilets
  • Accessible parking

Fountains Abbey

Fountains Abbey is an 18th-century monument consisting of a garden, canal, and some stunning countryside. The neo-Gothic castle within Studley Royal Park is one of the must-visit attractions.

Mobility facilities:

  • Wheelchairs and electric scooters can be hired
  • Disabled toilets
  • Accessible parking

The English Lake District

The English Lake District national park is the newest addition to the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the UK. This popular area is visited by 15.8 million visitors per year and as the name suggests is made up of lakes, forests, and mountains like Scafell Pike, which is the highest mountain in England. Some of the UK’s most famous wordsmiths have been inspired the beauty of the area, including William Wordsworth during the early 19th century.

Mobility facilities:

  • Wheelchairs, electric scooters and an electric people carrier can be hired
  • Disabled toilets
  • Accessible parking

Tower of London

The Tower of London is a fortress in Tower Hamlets, a London Borough. It is full of history, having not only been a fortress but a royal palace and prison. It is also one of the most popular tourist attractions in the UK with millions coming to see the Norman military architectural style of the Tower of London.

Mobility facilities:

  • Wheelchairs can be hired
  • Disabled toilets
  • Accessible parking

Old and New Towns of Edinburgh

The Scottish capital is divided into two areas: Old Town and New Town and both of these are recognised as World Heritage Sites because they include lots of historical monuments.

The Old Town boasts a medieval fortress and the New Town is where visitors can see European urban planning established in the 18th century.

Mobility facilities:

  • Disabled toilets
  • Accessible parking

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and Canal

The Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and Canal is a fine example of civil engineering during the Industrial Revolution in Europe in the 19th century.

In all, the aqueduct is 18-kilometres long and engineer Thomas Telford used cast and wrought iron for building the arches. During a visit here people can not only get stunning views of the surrounding area. But can learn about this magnificent engineering feat.

Mobility facilities:

  • Disabled toilets
  • Accessible parking

This news article is from Handicare UK. Articles that appear on this website are for information purposes only.