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Is fashion finally becoming inclusive for those with mobility problems?

14th November 2017

For many years people have felt the fashion industry set unattainable goals in the media but it also remained inaccessible on the high street. While setting ridiculously high beauty standards, it refused to drop door lintels and open accessible changing rooms, making the entire experience unpleasant for anyone with limited mobility. For those who rely on home stairlifts, an inability to even enter shops on the high street makes fashion thoroughly inaccessible and uninspiring.

 

One brand is, however, changing this view by launching a line geared towards physically disabled adults. Tommy Hilfiger has been at the forefront of American Fashion but is now looking at clothing designed for adults with physical disabilities. 

 

One of the key aims behind this campaign was mentioned in 2016’s ‘Runway of Dreams’ where Tommy Hilfiger wanted to look into adaptive clothing, offering children with physical disabilities more autonomy and independence dressing themselves. This is achieved by the use of alternative fastenings as buttons and zips can be difficult to manoeuvre. The clothes also featured adjustable openings and seams on legs to accommodate different body shapes.

 

The adult line has been rolled out across the global Tommy Hilfiger brand and thus far has been met with praise from various disabled charities. The element of the range that has received the most attention is that it does not look out of place amongst other ranges within the brand and thus promoting inclusivity previously unseen within fashion.

 

As the first brand to tackle an accessible range, it is hoped the success of this campaign will see other high profile designers following suit. Many people also hope this will cause many highstreets and high street chains to look at the accessibility of their stores and the experience they offer customers with limited mobility. 

Image Credit: Kunstakademiets Designskole

This news article is from Handicare UK. Articles that appear on this website are for information purposes only.